HOTEL HAN - YEREBATAN CAD 19., SULTANAHMET, İSTANBUL, TURKEY

Sultan Ahmed Mosque

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque or Sultan Ahmet Mosque (Turkish: Sultan Ahmet Camii) is a historic mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey’s Historic Centre. A popular tourist site, Sultan Ahmed Mosque continues as a mosque today with men kneeling in prayer on the mosque’s lush red carpet after the call to prayer. Construction of the Blue Mosque, as it is popularly known, was built between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed’s tomb, a madrasah and a hospice. Magnificent hand-painted blue tiles adorn the mosque’s interior walls and at night the mosque is bathed in blue as lights frame the mosque’s five main domes, six minarets and eight secondary domes.

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Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia (from the Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία Byzantine Greek [aˈʝia soˈfia]), “Holy Wisdom”; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) was a Greek Orthodox Christian patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 AD, and until 1453, it served as an Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarch of Constantinople,[1] except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire of Constantinople. The building was a mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931. It was then secularized and opened as a museum on 1 February 1935.

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Basilica Cistern

The Basilica Cistern (Turkish: Yerebatan Sarnıcı – “Cistern Sinking Into Ground”), is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul (formerly Constantinople), Turkey. The cistern, located 500 feet (150 m) southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I.

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Galata Tower

The Galata Tower (Galata Kulesi in Turkish) — called Christea Turris (the Tower of Christ in Latin) by the Genoese — is a medieval stone tower in the Galata/Karaköy quarter of Istanbul, Turkey, just to the north of the Golden Horn’s junction with the Bosphorus. One of the city’s most striking landmarks, it is a high, cone-capped cylinder that dominates the skyline and offers a panoramic vista of Istanbul’s historic peninsula and its environs.

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